The Cesky (chess-key) Terrier, also known as the Bohemian or Czech terrier, was developed by Czech geneticist Frantisek Horak.

The Scottish and Sealyham terriers were used to develop a breed of terrier that would work well in the open field as go to ground. This terrier was developed with a narrower chest and smaller head than the Scottish and Sealyham terrier to avoid getting stuck down a hole while chasing vermin and small animals. Temperament was also something Mr. Horak was interested in improving for a small working terrier. He succeeded in developing the Cesky after his initial breeding in 1949, of a Sealyham male to a Scottie bitch, and received official recognition by the FCI in 1963.

The FCI standard dictates that this breed should be 27 to 35 cm (10.5 to 13.5 in.) at the withers and weigh between 6 & 9 kg. (13 to 20 lbs.)

 

 

Devised by Mr. Frantisek Horak, a top-ranked geneticist from the Czech Republic, the Cesky Terrier is one dog world's best kept secrets and one of the few terrier breeds that did not derive from the British Islands. This modern creation is a rare combination of beauty and ability, a "small, slim and elegant" terrier that is a true go-to-ground working dog. Originally devised from crosses of the Scottish and Sealyham Terriers, today's Cesky Terrier is a purebred dog through and through, recognized by the American Kennel Club and all of the world's major registries.

The Cesky Terrier  a book by author, Katherine Eckstrom is a wonderful book to read.    Katherine  is the heiress apparent of Mr. Horak, having cooperated with the famous geneticist before his death and continuing to breed his dream dogs from his original line of Czech dogs. Mrs. Eckstrom is the world authority of the Cesky Terrier, an American breeder who is highly respected in the Czech Republic and around the world. Her book on the Cesky Terrier offers a comprehensive history of the breed, from the creation of the breed in Europe to its rise in today's world of purebred dogs. In discussing the breed's characteristics, the author presents an interview with Dr. Horak, thus providing the most authoritative account of the breed's desirable physical traits and personality and an explanation of the breed standard



Ceskies have two distinct colour variances, blue-gray and brown. Most common is the blue-gray variety ranging from light platinum to charcoal gray with black nose and brown eyes. The Cesky coat type is such that hand stripping is not required. Clipping and scissoring maintains the soft, silky coat. The Cesky does not require tail docking or ear cropping. In 1996 the FCI standard #246 was changed to 6-10 kg. (13-22 lbs.) weight and stands 27 to 29 cm (10.5 to 12 in). The FCI standard #246 is the only one excepted world wide and by Canadian Kennel Club, the Canadian National Cesky Terrier Club and in Rare Breed Assn. in North America.